Short-Term Impact of a Teen Pregnancy-Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes

Roy F. Oman, Sara K. Vesely, Jennifer Green, Janene Fluhr, Jean Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose Youth living in group home settings are at significantly greater risk for sexual risk behaviors; however, there are no sexual health programs designed specifically for these youth. The study's purpose was to assess the effectiveness of a teen pregnancy-prevention program for youth living in group home foster care settings and other out-of-home placements. Methods The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial involving youth (N = 1,037) recruited from 44 residential group homes located in California, Maryland, and Oklahoma. Within each state, youth (mean age = 16.2 years; 82% male; 37% Hispanic, 20% African-American, 20% white, and 17% multiracial) in half the group homes were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 40 clusters) and the other half were randomly assigned to a control group that offered “usual care” (n = 40 clusters). The intervention (i.e., Power Through Choices [PTC]) was a 10-session, age-appropriate, and medically accurate sexual health education program. Results Compared to the control group, youth in the PTC intervention showed significantly greater improvements (p <.05) from preintervention to postintervention in all three knowledge areas, one of two attitude areas, all three self-efficacy areas, and two of three behavioral intention areas. Conclusions This is the first published randomized controlled trial of a teen pregnancy-prevention program designed for youth living in foster care settings and other out-of-home placements. The numerous significant improvements in short-term outcomes are encouraging and provide preliminary evidence that the PTC program is an effective pregnancy-prevention program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)584-591
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Group Homes
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Power (Psychology)
Reproductive Health
Randomized Controlled Trials
Self Efficacy
Home Care Services
Health Education
Hispanic Americans
Sexual Behavior
African Americans
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Group homes
  • Intervention
  • Psychosocial change
  • Reproductive health
  • Sex education
  • Teen pregnancy prevention
  • Youth in foster care
  • Youth sexual risk behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Short-Term Impact of a Teen Pregnancy-Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes. / Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Green, Jennifer; Fluhr, Janene; Williams, Jean.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 584-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Green, Jennifer; Fluhr, Janene; Williams, Jean / Short-Term Impact of a Teen Pregnancy-Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 584-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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